IAS Home

Introduction:
English  - Español
Português
-
Türkçe
Catalan - Deutsch
Pyccкий - Japanese
Finnish

Grants Awarded

IAS Newsletter

How To Help

IAS Supporters

Great Books

Apply for a Grant

Who is the IAS?

Contact the IAS

Links

 

Site Index

 

Grants Awarded

The IAS annually awards $8000 in grants to writers whose work is important to the anarchist critique of domination, who exhibit a clear financial need, and whose piece is likely to be widely distributed.

February 2003
  • $1000 to Black Roses, Black Masks: The American Anarchist Movement and its Media in the Vietnam Years by Justin F. Jackson
  • $800 to Anarchy Revolution Freedom: Toward Anarchist Cultural Theory by Sandra Jeppesen
  • $1200 to Rage at Dawn by Errol Schweizer
  • $1000 to Building New Contexts for Anarchist Graphics, Video, and Film by Josh MacPhee

July 2001

  • $2000 to Carlos Fernandez and Jena Cephas for: Anarchists of Color.
  • $1000 to Ronald Campbell for The Anarchist Within: Anarchist Prisoners Building a Movement.
  • $1000 to Bill Weinberg for Pachamama Betrayed: Ecological Crime and Indigenous Resistance to the Andean Drug Wars.

January 2001

  • $2000 to Caitlin Hewitt-White for "Gender in Current Anti-Globalization Activism in Canada."
  • $1500 to Jessica Lawless for "Racializing Anarchism Then and Now."
  • $2000 to Andrés Peréz and Felipe del Solar for Chile: Anarchist Practices Under Pinochet.
  • $500 to Will Firth for three Russian-to-English translations.

June 2000

  • $1000 to Kevin Doyle for Orange Fire.
  • $1000 to Lucien van der Walt for "Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904-1921."

January 2000

  • $1500 to Mike Staudenmaier for Towards a New Anarchist Theory of Nationalism.
  • $2500 to Alberto Villarreal for the Spanish translation of Murray Bookchin's Remaking Society: Pathways to a Green Future (Rehaciendo la Sociedad).

June 1999

  • $2200 to Fernando Gustavo López Trujillo for The FACA and the Anarchist Movement in Argentina, 1930-1950.
  • $800 to C.W. Brown for “Vanguards of the Crusaders: Freedom and Domination in Right-wing Discourse”.

January 1999

  • 2000 to Samuel Mbah for Military Dictatorship and the State in Africa.

June 1998

  • $1000 to Joe Lowndes for Anarchism and the Rise of Rightwing Anti-statism.
  • $900 to Patricia Greene for Federica Montseny: The Woman and the Ideal/La Mujer y El Ideal.
  • $600 to Will Firth for the three translations (Russian and Bulgarian into English).

  • $500 to Lucien van der Walt for Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904 – 1921.

January 1998

  • $2000 to Chris Day for Anarchism and the Zapatista Revolution.
  • $1200 to Matt Hern and Stu Chaulk for The Myth of the Internet: Private Isolation and Local Community.
  • $800 to Melissa Burch for Autonomy, Culture, and Natural Resources in the Neo-liberal Age.

June 1997

  • $1000 to Zoe Erwin and Brian Tokar for Engineering Life: A People’s Guide to Biotechnology.
  • $500 to Frank Adams for "The Educational Ideas and Management Practices of 19th and 20th Century Anarchists in Labor-Owned Cooperatives."
  • $250 to Peter Lamborn Wilson for the introduction to Freedom - My Dream: The Autobiography of Enrico Arrigoni.
  • $250 to Mark Bonhert and Richard Curtis for Post-Industrial Resources: Anarchist Reconstructive Efforts & Visions in the Upper Midwest.

January 1997

  • $1000 to Murray Bookchin for the completion of The Spanish Anarchists.
  • $1000 to Alan Antliff for his book, The Culture of Revolt: Art and Anarchy in America.
  • $500 to Kwaku Kushindana for "Avoiding New Forms of Repression: An African-American Reply."
  • $500 to Paul Fleckenstein for "Civic Space and the Anarchist Dream."

See Also: How to Find IAS-Supported Projects


July 2001 Grant Awards

The IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals for July 2001:

$2000 to Carlos Fernandez and Jena Cephas for their two part project Anarchists of Color (recently renamed The Quilombo Project). This project will explore the experience and theories of people of color within anarchism. The first part of the project, in the form of interviews and reports, will describe the actual presence of people of color in contemporary US anarchism. The second part, a 15 – 20 page overview of the theories used by anarchists of color in comparison with anarchist canons, will seek to revaluate anarchist theory in the light of the comparison. For up to date information on the project, there is a website for the project, at http://www.quilomboproject.org. Carlos Fernandez is pursuing an undergraduate degree in Film Studies while his activist work ranges from protests of the Gulf War to current prison reform work and his work has been published in Arsenal Magazine and Onward Magazine. Jena Cepha is currently studying architecture as an undergraduate with a focus on gentrification and affordable housing and she has been engaged in grassroots activism for over ten years, including the Youth Power! Anti-racist conference in Detroit, 1996.

$1000 to Ronald Campbell for his project The Anarchist Within: Anarchist Prisoners Building a Movement. This project will examine contributions made by imprisoned anarchists to the anarchist community and will cover the various organizations and projects founded by these prisoners, as well as their reception by fellow prisoners, prison administrators, and the anarchist community. While many prisoners have written for various anarchist publications, this project focuses on anarchist groups operating within prison. Ronald Campbell has been actively involved in anarchist support groups as well as, while serving time, anarchist groups within prison.

$1000 to Bill Weinberg for his book in progress Pachamama Betrayed: Ecological Crime and Indigenous Resistance to the Andean Drug Wars. This book seeks to deconstruct the Orwellian euphemism of the “War on Drugs” to reveal how US military involvement in Latin American has not changed since the era of “gunboat diplomacy.” By dissecting corporate interests in Columbia and examining indigenous resistance movements against US plans for the region, which violate international standards on war crimes and genocide, it will make a case for the revival of anti-war activism in the US and forge ties between the US and Andean activist communities. Bill Weinberg is the author of War on the Land: Ecology and Politics in Central America (Zed, 1990) and Homage to Chiapas: The New Indigenous Struggles in Mexico (Verso, 2000).


January 2001 Grant Awards

The IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals for January 2001 (actual board meeting held February 10, 2001 due to weather delays):

$2000 to Caitlin Hewitt-White, for her study, "Gender in Current Anti-Globalization Activism in Canada." Using Canadian examples, her project will assess the potential effectiveness of the current anti-globalization movement in resisting capitalist globalization and in reconstructing a society based on freedom, equality, cooperation, and justice. First-hand information will be gathered from activists, which will then be analyzed within broad social and political themes to discuss the challenges that face the anti-globalization movement in not only resisting capitalism, but also in confronting oppression in all its forms and in all spaces. In the face of a rejuvenated movement, this project will hopefully help us to correct on-going problems such as sexism within the left. Caitlin is a student at the University of Waterloo and is active in the Peak Collective and Guelph Action Network.

$1500 to Jessica Lawless for her article and documentary, "Racializing Anarchism Then and Now." This piece focuses on the re-emergence of anarchism in the broader public sphere since the protest in Seattle and subsequent international anti-globalization protests. Addressing both anarchist and non-anarchist identified audiences, this study will counter mainstream mediated portrayals of the anarchist protestors as ahistorical, violent, young, white males who are incapable of offering a viable critique of society. In particular, it will argue that the mainstream media has agitated public anxieties toward young people who identify as anarchists by relying on racialized and racist constructions of "blackness" and urban uprising, taking the focus off the issues being raised and putting it instead on issues of law and order. Jessica, currently a graduate student at Claremont Graduate Univeristy, has been active in many areas, including women's self defense, social work, and as an organizer of various anarchist collectives in Seattle.

$2000 to Andrés Peréz and Felipe del Solar for their book Chile: Anarchist Practices Under Pinochet. As the title indicates, this piece focuses on anarchist practices and organization under Pinochet's military dictatorship from a political as well as cultural perspective. The study will span Pinochet's reign, beginning in 1973, to the present, by tracing the social manifestations, organizational relationships, and political contributions of anarchists. Andrés Pérez is an international free-lance journalist and writes for the national political magazine Ercilla. Felipe del Solar is studying history at the Universidad Cató lica de Chile, and has taught at Infocap, the university of the workers, in Santiago, Chile.

$500 to Will Firth for his translation of three Russian writings, "Russian Capitalism and Globalization" by the MPST (the local Moscow group of the KRAS-IWA) from a 1999 collection of essays entitled The Return of the Working Class. The second piece is actually two essays on Nestor Makhno, one by Russian anarchist Ida Melt; and another by N. Sukhogorskaya, originally published in Nestor Ivanovich Makhno (ed. VF Verstyuk, Dzvin Publishers, Kiev 1991). The first piece in an anarcho-syndicalist look at the economic and power structures in the USSR and contemporary Russia and examines how they fit into the world economy; and the real-existing labor movement in Russia and draws conclusions about the kind of autonomous, anti-capitalist workers' movement which would be needed to combat rampant neo-liberalism. The Makhno pieces are of a historical nature, incorporating recent research on Makhno and his wife.


June 2000 Grant Awards

The IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals in June 2000:

$1000 to Kevin Doyle for Orange Fire, a three act theater play about the life, beliefs and struggles of Irish activist Captain Jack White (1879-1946), who strongly identified as an anarchist. White's life and anarchist beliefs have all but been obliterated due to the destruction of his memoirs and papers by his family (White came from a privileged Protestant family loyal to the British monarchy) and the fact that, as a revolutionary, he has been "written out" of the history books. In order to provide a framework with which activists can challenge sectarian divisions in Ireland, this play aims to situate White within Irish revolutionary history as well as anarchism and draws on the destruction of White's papers as a metaphor for the repressive mentality of a sectarian society. Kevin Doyle is an award winning short story writer and political activist. He is a founding member of the Workers Solidarity Movement, an anarchist organization in Ireland.

$1000 to Lucien van der Walt for "Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904-1921", which expands upon a project previously funded by the IAS. This new work will deal with the influence of anarchism and revolutionary syndicalism on broader social movements in the same period. The specific focus is on the impact of libertarian socialist ideas on trade unions and Black Nationalism. This project builds upon the original research into the influence of anarchism and revolutionary syndicalism on revolutionary groups in South Africa. Lucien van der Walt is a student, teacher and activist in South Africa. His work focuses on trade union activity in Africa and he has written extensively on historical and contemporary labor politics.


January 2000 Grant Awards

The IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals in January 2000:

$1500 to Mike Staudenmaier for his piece, Towards a New Anarchist Theory of Nationalism. This piece will develop an in-depth historical analysis on anarchist theories of nationalism and the diversity of opinions within anarchism. It will focus on a contradiction between theory rooted in class-based international criticism and a practice normally consisting of uncritical antiimperialist and antiracist solidarity. He intends to show that this contradiction between theory and practice, along with very little written on contemporary nationalism from an anarchist perspective, only serves to polarize the issue of nationalism. Ethnic groups try to advance their freedom at all costs and anarchism often dismisses nationalistic struggles out-of-hand due to the historically simplistic anarchist belief that all people will triumph equally. This piece will include a case study of contemporary revolutionary nationalism; an intellectual history of anarchism and nationalism looking at writers such Mikhail Bakunin, Gustav Landuar, Rudolp Rocker, and Freddy Perlman; and a section on contemporary issues that often intersect with nationalistic struggles, such as prison and antifascist activism. To be completed in March 2001, this piece will provide us with an innovative and sophisticated understanding of nationalism from an anarchist perspective. Mike Staudenmaier has been an active anarchist for ten years now, primarily in the Chicago area. He has also worked extensively with the Puerto Rican community in Chicago and has had opportunity to interact with members of the Puerto Rican nationalist movement on a daily basis
for several years.

$2500 to Alberto Villarreal for his Spanish translation of Murray Bookchin's Remaking Society: Pathways to a Green Future (Rehaciendo la Sociedad). Originally published in 1990, this book is meant to be a summarization of social ecology, a political philosophy that bases the ecological crisis in the emergence of social hierarchy and domination and advocates for a radical transformation of society. A wide variety of Spanish speaking movements, particularly in Latin America, are struggling with social and ecological issues, which can be radicalized by ideas presented in Remaking Society.  To be completed by September 2001, this translation project will greatly add to Latin American radical intellectualism. Alberto Villarreal has translated several of Bookchin's essays for Comunidad, newsletter for the Comunidad project of Sweden and Uruguay,  and Tierra Amiga, magazine of REDES - Friends of the Earth Uruguay. He was a founding member of REDES and has been actively involved with social ecology for the last fifteen years.


June 1999 Grant Awards

The IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals in June 1999:

$2200 to Fernando Gustavo López Trujillo for this piece, The FACA and the Anarchist Movement in Argentina, 1930-1950. This piece will be a historical study of the Federación Anarquista Comunista Argentina (FACA). He will examine the growth of the FACA from 1935 and into the 1940’s, a development that is exceptional given that the Argentine anarchist movement and its organizations were shrinking at this time (after being the largest anarchist movement in Latin America). He will then look at the decline of the FACA in the 1940’s and 1950’s and the relationship of its decline to the rise of the Peronist movement. Lopez will search for the deep reasons of the FACA’s demise, arguing that state repression cannot be counted as a primary cause. It will contain chapters such as “The Coup D’Etat of Uriburu and the Rise of the FACA”; “The 1930’s Strikes”; “The Civil War in Spain”; and “The Dictatorship of 1943 and the Rise of the Peronism.” The work will be written in Spanish.

The scheduled date for the completion of this project is March 2000. López lives in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

$800 to C.W. Brown for “Vanguards of the Crusaders: Freedom and Domination in Right-wing Discourse.” This project will study the social and political theory of the patriot right in the US as seen through the lenses of classical anarchist theory. It has two objectives: first, to understand the patriot right discourse in the contemporary US in the context of anarchist studies in fascism, and second, to grasp the extent to which that patriot right discourse resonates with everyday American ideology and thus expresses the clean outlines of the ideology of domination in the ‘new world order’. The scheduled completion date for this project is Fall 1999. Brown lives in Greenfield, Massachusetts.


January 1999 Grant Award

In January 1999, the IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award a grant to the following individual:

$2000 to Samuel Mbah for his book Military Dictatorship and the State in Africa (co-authored by I.E. Igariwey). This book will utilize an anarchist critique to analyze military dictatorship on the African continent. It is intended to follow up their previous book, African Anarchism: The History of a Movement (See Sharp Press, 1997).

Mbah and Igariwey will use libertarian analytical tools to lay bare the problems of military dictatorship. They will demonstrate that military dictatorship is a logical, if perverse, extension of the state system (despite liberal and state socialist criticisms). They will also show that overthrowing military dictatorship does not remedy the instability, economic difficulties, and lack of freedom inherent in the state system and neo-colonial capitalism.

Drawing on case studies of Nigeria, Egypt, Zaire, and other countries, they will address the role of the military as an institution on the African continent since the 1960's. They will examine military dictatorship in an historical context, the relationship between the military and state system, and its connection to the international political order. They will also portray the repression of free speech and human rights, corruption and economic mismanagement, and the destruction of communal African values.

The authors will conclude that overthrowing military dictatorships will not put an end to the oppressive conditions on the African continent. They will show that military dictatorships are not isolated aberrations of the state system and that nothing short of an anarchist response to the state and capitalism will fundamentally advance the African people to freedom.

The scheduled completion date for this project is December 1999.


Grants Awarded in June, 1998

On June 13, 1998 the IAS Board of Directors awarded grants to the following individuals:

$1000 to Joe Lowndes for his piece, Anarchism and the Rise of Rightwing Anti-statism. This work will analyze the emergence of anti-government politics on the American right, contrast this with the current failure of the anarchist left to construct and convey a viable anti-statist politics, and discuss the centrality of race to both. It will explore the historic connection between decentralism and racial domination in American political culture in order to advance an anarchist politics that can express an anti-statist populism delinked from discourses of racial domination. Lowndes lives in Brooklyn, New York.

$900 to Patricia Greene for Federica Montseny: The Woman and the Ideal/La Mujer y El Ideal. This book will present the first comprehensive English language study of the works and political legacy of Federica Montseny, an important Spanish anarchist and intellectual. Greene lives in East Lansing, Michigan.

$600 to Will Firth for the translation of three articles on Eastern European anarchism from Russian and Bulgarian into English. The two Russian articles are: "A Survey of the Anarchist Movement in the Ukraine 1987-1994)" and "Under Fire Between the Lines" (about the Volunteer Medical Brigade formed by socialists and anarchists in 1993 during the conflicts over the seizure of the Russian parliament). The Bulgarian translation will be a ‘compilation’ of various chapters from the book National Liberation and Libertarian Federalism by Georgi Khadzhieff. Firth lives in Berlin, Germany.

$500 to Lucien van der Walt for a collection of historical articles entitled Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904 – 1921. Van der Walt lives in Johannesburg, South Africa.


Grants awarded in January 1998:

On January 17, 1998 the IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals:

$2000 to Chris Day for Anarchism and the Zapatista Revolution. This book will develop a revolutionary, anti-authoritarian analysis of Zapatismo as expressed in the words and deeds of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) and Zapatista communities in Chiapas, Mexico. It will have three main components: an empirical investigation of Zapatista theory and practice, a consideration of the two main forms of libertarian thinking in Mexico – the traditions of indigenous autonomy and European anarchism; and finally an investigation of the more recent historical roots of the EZLN in the Mexican New Left and the indigenous struggles of Chiapas in the past few decades. It will draw out some of the important lessons that the Zapatista struggle has to offer contemporary anarchism. Chris is currently in Chiapas, Mexico.

$1200 to Matt Hern and Stu Chaulk for The Myth of the Internet: Private Isolation and Local Community. This book will use a radically democratic, anarchist perspective to investigate and critique the social and cultural repercussions of the Internet. It will argue that, while the Internet appears to be a medium for genuine communication and democracy, it is actually undermining the very arenas in which actual freedom and democracy can flourish. Matt and Stu live in Vancouver, British Columbia.

$800 to Melissa Burch for Autonomy, Culture, and Natural Resources in the Neo-liberal Age. This piece will present a comparative critique of the domination of global capitalism and its devastating effects on the local culture in three regions: the Mexican State of Chiapas, the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua, and the state of Vermont. It will bring to light the fundamental incompatibility of the neoliberal model with an authentic, local, and ecological culture. Melissa lives in Plainfield, Vermont.


Grants Awarded in June 1997:

On June 15, 1997, the IAS Board of Directors was pleased to award grants to the following individuals:

$1000 to Zoe Erwin and Brian Tokar for the production of Engineering Life: A People’s Guide to Biotechnology. This anthology of essays will bring a comprehensive and radical perspective to current debates on biotechnology. It will emphasize the urgent need for an activist response to biotechnology and that efforts against it must also challenge larger structures of social domination.

$500 to Frank Adams for the essay, The Educational Ideas and Management Practices of 19th and 20th Century Anarchists in Labor-Owned Cooperatives. This essay will explore the practical educational efforts made by anarchists to end the exploitation of their labor by capital. It will examine their accomplishments and failures in order to enhance our ability to organize work wisely, effectively, and in accord with anarchist values.

$250 to Peter Lamborn Wilson for an introduction to Freedom - My Dream: The Autobiography of Enrico Arrigoni. Enrico Arrigoni (a.k.a. "Frank Brand") was an anarchist author and activist of Italian descent who lived in New York from 1924 until his death in 1986. His remarkable life included a stay in Russia during the early years of the revolution, participation in the Spanish Civil War, and a lifelong commitment to anarchism. Wilson’s intro-duction will analyze and introduce elements of Arrigoni’s life and work.

$250 to Mark Bonhert and Richard Curtis for Post-Industrial Resources: Anarchist Reconstructive Efforts & Visions in the Upper Midwest. Bonhert and Curtis will write an oral history and analysis of contemporary anarchist efforts to rebuild community in areas of the Midwest devastated by capital flight, urban neglect, and the repression of marginalized people.


Grants Awarded in January 1997:

On January 11, 1997, the IAS Board of Directors awarded the first IAS grants to the following individuals:

$1000 to Murray Bookchin for the completion of his book, The Spanish Anarchists. This new book will complement the first volume, which chronicled the Spanish anarchist movement from 1868 to 1936, by exploring the period from the outbreak of social revolution in 1936 to Franco’s victory in 1939. It will conclude with a discussion of lessons to be drawn from the entire Spanish experience.

$1000 to Alan Antliff for his book, The Culture of Revolt: Art and Anarchy in America. This book will clarify the pivotal role played by anarchism in the development of modern art in America. It will explore both turn-of-the-century debates about the relationship between art and politics and the development of discourses that cast anarchism in the arts as part of a larger revolutionary culture. It will demonstrate that anarchist artists and art critics formulated their artistic practices and criticism to further radical programs of social transformation.

$500 to Kwaku Kushindana for his essay, "Avoiding New Forms of Repression: An African-American Reply." This piece will examine the rise of conservative tendencies within African-American politics. It will begin with an analysis of the black liberation struggle of the 1960’s, which will set the context for a critique of contemporary black leaders and a concluding discussion of the black tradition of anarchy.

$500 to Paul Fleckenstein for his piece, "Civic Space and the Anarchist Dream." This essay will use Burlington, Vermont, as a case study for a critique of contemporary municipal development policy and practice. It will explore the market’s transformation of images of civic space, the structural dependence of the municipality on the international market and the nation-state, and the implications of these developments for an ecological, anarchist politics.

If you are interested in applying for a grant, please click here.