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Rudolf Rocker (1873 - 1958) is best remembered as perhaps one of the best educated, most erudite and articulate anarcho-syndicalist writers and union activists of the Twentieth century. His writings contain countless penetrating insights into the nature of power and its effects on the human character and the social environment. They ring of a deep desire for complete liberty of action and equality of situation, and as such are quite unique.

The story of Rocker's own life is also revealing. Not only did he talk of liberty and equality, but he practised both in his own life. His involvement with the Jewish community of London and his agitation against the Nazi regime in his native Germany reveals much about his character in this respect.

This site is dedicated to making available at least some of the writings of a brilliant mind, and without turning him into some sort of anarcho-idol, paying tribute to his efforts towards the cause of freedom and the creation of a less shallow, less insane world.


"Anarchism recognises only the relative significance of ideas, institutions, and social conditions. It is, therefore not a fixed, self enclosed social system, but rather a definite trend in the historical development of mankind, which, in contrast with the intellectual guardianship of all clerical and governmental institutions, strives for the free unhindered unfolding of all the individual and social forces in life. Even freedom is only a relative, not an absolute concept, since it tends constantly to broaden its scope and to affect wider circles in manifold ways. For the Anarchist, freedom is not an abstract philosophical concept, but the vital concrete possibility for every human being to bring to full development all capacities and talents with which nature has endowed him, and turn them to social account. The less this natural development of man is interfered with by ecclesiastical or political guardianship, the more efficient and harmonious will human personality become, the more will it become the measure of the intellectual culture of the society in which it has grown."

- Rudolf Rocker, "Anarcho-Syndicalism"


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